The Resurrection

The nurse, the wife, the niece, and I sat together in the small family room, quietly thinking. I felt insulated from the sounds of the busy hospital even as my pager chirped a warning that our ICU was about to get even busier. I resisted the temptation to sit on the edge of the seat and betray the anxiety I felt and the urgency of the conversation. We were gathered to discuss the critical decision to intubate a patient, a man who lay struggling to breathe in a bed just down the hall. We had been trying for days to stave this moment off with a tight facemask that forced pure oxygen into his lungs, but he had been ripping it off in his confused and deteriorating state. He was tiring out rapidly and an internal clock in the back of my mind was counting down towards that tipping point when even intubation might cause his heart to stop and actually hasten his death.

I looked at the wife and remembered our first meeting a few days earlier, when the patient first crashed into the ICU. At that time, she told me how she had been living in the hospital for two weeks, watching helplessly as his first round of chemotherapy set off a series of nasty complications. She told me that the one day she went home to get some rest was the day she got a frantic phone call telling her to come back in and this time to the ICU. I told her she had permission to not feel guilty about going home and she burst into tears of relief, sorrow, and exhaustion. We talked then about his tenuous condition and how sufficient recovery to tolerate the next round of chemotherapy was difficult but not impossible.

But in the days since he only did worse. In the disorientation brought about by his decline, he was in a constant state of fear, agitation, and anxiety. And now, at the edge of his viability, it became my job as the supervising resident to tell her that we were reaching the point of extremis: that his survival depended on breathing through a tube which we might never be able to remove, that his respiratory failure came at the end of a chain of other failing organs, and that even if he survived the ICU stay it was unlikely at his age and in his condition that he would ever recover enough to tolerate the next round of chemotherapy. So I told her what she already knew and we sat still for a moment in that waiting room, listening to my pager and the muted sounds of hospital chaos outside.

Then she cried. She cried as she told us how just a month ago he had been fishing with his grandson without any cares or illness. She cried as she told us how he had just asked his son to fetch his gun from home so he could shoot himself. She cried as she told us that she didn’t want to see him suffer, that she knew it was time to let him go, but that she still didn’t want to lose him either. I watched the niece cry and even the nurse cry as we felt the force of all her helplessness and fatigue and grief.

I have rarely felt the gravity of a moment as I did then, weighing the value of every word and pause against the ticking of that clock. We decided to let him pass, to stop our modern medical torture and transition him to hospice. And even though I and every other specialist had known from the beginning that this would be the best outcome for the worst and final situation of his life, it still felt like utter and hopeless defeat.

In that moment, I asked if he was a man of faith. His niece offered that he was, and remembered that he always insisted on holding hands and praying together before meals every Thanksgiving and Christmas and Easter. So I offered to pray for them and we did. We gave thanks for the life of love that he lived and the deep affection of family that was the reason why these moments and decisions were so hard. We prayed for the release of his suffering, that in Christ our death is not final but will be overcome. And, in an unusual moment, we even had the audacity to pray for joy.

We left the room and I rushed off to set up the incoming arrival of three sick patients to the ICU. It was so busy that I could not return to the patient’s room for several hours. When I finally sat down at a computer to plug in some orders and take care of paperwork, the nurse came up to me and asked, “Have you been back in the room yet?” I sheepishly said I hadn’t, it had been so busy…

“It’s a completely different room,” she said excitedly. “Before that conversation, it was like a funeral; now they’re talking and laughing and joking and sharing stories about their memories together. I have never seen a doctor pray like that before.” I was stunned; I hadn’t expected such a change either. I stopped by the room and drew back the curtain to see it exactly as she said. I saw the wife’s face transformed, smiling even through her puffy red eyes, the great weight having visibly been lifted from her.

I didn’t cry once throughout the entire encounter but for some reason can feel the tears brim in my own eyes now as I write about it. It has been years but the memory is still clear and bright because, to me, it is the closest thing I have ever seen to a resurrection.

He is risen!

The Resurrection

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